Jeffrey J. Bednarski, M.D., Ph.D.  bednarski_j@kids.wustl.edu

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology
Developmental BiologyHematology and Oncology

phone: (314) 454-6018

Clinical Interests

Dr. Bednarski's clinical practice focuses on bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of malignant and immunological disorders in children and young adults.

Education

  • BS, Summa Cum Laude, Duke University1995
  • PhD, University of Michigan2003
  • MD, Graduation with Distinction in Research, University of Michigan2003

Training

  • Postdoctoral Fellow in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital2003 - 2003
  • Resident in Pediatrics, St. Louis Children's Hospital2003 - 2006
  • Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine2006 - 2009
  • Postdoctoral Fellow in Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine2007 - 2013

Licensure and Board Certification

  • American Board of Pediatrics, Board Certified 2006
  • MO, Medical License 2009
  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Board Certified 2011

Honors

  • Phi Eta Sigma, National Freshman Honor Society1992
  • Golden Key National Honor Society1993
  • National Institute of General Medicine Summer Scholar1993
  • Phi Beta Kappa1994
  • Phi Lambda Upsilon, National Honorary Chemical Society1994
  • Summa cum laude graduate, Duke University1995
  • Regent's Fellowship, University of Michigan Rackham Graduate School1997 - 2001
  • Graduation with Distinction in Research, University of Michigan Medical School2003
  • James P. Keating Ouststanding Resident Award, St. Louis Children's Hospital2005
  • David Gilstrap Memorial Award, St. Louis Children's Hospital2008
  • Hyundai Hope on Wheels Scholar2012 - 2013
  • Hyundai Hope on Wheels Scholar2012 - 2013

Recent Publications view all (19)


Publication Co-Authors

  1. RAG-mediated DNA double-strand breaks activate a cell type-specific checkpoint to inhibit pre-B cell receptor signals. J Exp Med. 2016;213(2):209-23. PMCID:PMC4749927  PMID:26834154 
  2. A Novel Secreted Protein, MYR1, Is Central to Toxoplasma's Manipulation of Host Cells. MBio. 2016;7(1):e02231-15. PMCID:PMC4742717  PMID:26838724 
  3. Maternal T-Cell Engraftment Interferes With Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency. Am J Clin Pathol. 2016;145(2):251-7. PMCID:PMC4901308  PMID:26834123 
  4. DNA damage signals inhibit neutrophil function. Blood. 2015;126(26):2773-4. PMCID:PMC4692138  PMID:26705340 
  5. Enhancer sequence variants and transcription-factor deregulation synergize to construct pathogenic regulatory circuits in B-cell lymphoma. Immunity. 2015;42(1):186-98. doi:10.1016/j.immuni.2014.12.021  PMCID:PMC4302272  PMID:25607463 
  6. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;133(2):335-47. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.07.052  PMCID:PMC3960312  PMID:24139498 
  7. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase controls Igκ allelic exclusion by inhibiting secondary Vκ-to-Jκ rearrangements. J Exp Med. 2013;210(2):233-9. doi:10.1084/jem.20121605  PMCID:PMC3570110  PMID:23382544 
  8. Integrated signaling in developing lymphocytes: the role of DNA damage responses. Cell Cycle. 2012;11(22):4129-34. doi:10.4161/cc.22021  PMCID:PMC3524208  PMID:23032308 
  9. RAG-induced DNA double-strand breaks signal through Pim2 to promote pre-B cell survival and limit proliferation. J Exp Med. 2012;209(1):11-7. doi:10.1084/jem.20112078  PMCID:PMC3260864  PMID:22201128 
  10. Lymphocyte development: integration of DNA damage response signaling. Adv Immunol. 2012;116:175-204. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-394300-2.00006-5  PMID:23063077 
  11. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) and DNA-PKcs kinases have overlapping activities during chromosomal signal joint formation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011;108(5):2022-7. doi:10.1073/pnas.1013295108  PMCID:PMC3033293  PMID:21245316 
  12. H2AX prevents CtIP-mediated DNA end resection and aberrant repair in G1-phase lymphocytes. Nature. 2011;469(7329):245-9. doi:10.1038/nature09585  PMCID:PMC3150591  PMID:21160476 
  13. MRN complex function in the repair of chromosomal Rag-mediated DNA double-strand breaks. J Exp Med. 2009;206(3):669-79. doi:10.1084/jem.20081326  PMCID:PMC2699138  PMID:19221393 
  14. A novel benzodiazepine increases the sensitivity of B cells to receptor stimulation with synergistic effects on calcium signaling and apoptosis. J Biol Chem. 2004;279(28):29615-21. doi:10.1074/jbc.M403507200  PMID:15123639 
  15. Attenuation of autoimmune disease in Fas-deficient mice by treatment with a cytotoxic benzodiazepine. Arthritis Rheum. 2003;48(3):757-66. doi:10.1002/art.10968  PMID:12632430 
  16. Male infertility and thiamine-dependent erythroid hypoplasia in mice lacking thiamine transporter Slc19a2. Mol Genet Metab. 2003;80(1-2):234-41. PMID:14567973 
  17. Benzodiazepine-induced superoxide signals B cell apoptosis: mechanistic insight and potential therapeutic utility. J Clin Invest. 2002;110(8):1123-32. doi:10.1172/JCI16029  PMCID:PMC150800  PMID:12393848 
  18. The C2 domains of Rabphilin3A specifically bind phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate containing vesicles in a Ca2+-dependent manner. In vitro characteristics and possible significance. J Biol Chem. 1998;273(17):10240-8. PMID:9553075 
  19. Function of the htrB high temperature requirement gene of Escherichia coli in the acylation of lipid A: HtrB catalyzed incorporation of laurate. J Biol Chem. 1996;271(20):12095-102. PMID:8662613 
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