Infectious Diseases | Fellowships | Current Fellows

Current Fellows

Stephanie S. Cabler, MD (Combined ID/Critical Care, Year 3)

Medical School: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Residency and Chief Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Scholarly Project: Viral DNA reactivation in pediatric sepsis immunophenotypes (Dr. Greg Storch) Favorite microbe: Ehrlichia chaffeensis. You can't live in St. Louis without seeing at least a few children with ehrlichiosis each summer. Some even present with or develop hyperferritinemic sepsis (aka MAS aka HLH)- so cool!
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: Infectious diseases are everywhere! The majority of admitted children have an infectious disease, many of which cause critical illness. Being able to thoughtfully and eloquently evaluate and treat critically ill children with infections or infectious complications is a dream of mine.
What I love about Washington University: Combining two fellowships can be complicated. I knew at WashU I would have the support I needed (or didn't even know I needed) from both outstanding divisions to advocate for my diverse interests. It's great knowing that everyone is invested in my success!

Sarah Greene, MD, PhD (Accelerated Research Pathway/PSTP, Year 3)

Medical School: Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Scholarly project: Developing improved diagnostics for filarial neglected tropical diseases (Dr. Gary Weil)
T32: Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunity Training Program
Favorite microbe: I enjoy all microbes and choosing just one favorite feels like bad parenting. If I had to, it would be Treponema pallidum, because spirochetes are awesome and they can swim wherever they want. 
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: So many reasons. The difficulty I have in choosing a favorite microbe probably means I chose my specialty correctly. 
What I love about Washington University: Our program is great because we see cool cases with fun people and there is nothing better than that.

Jaimee Hall, DO, MA (Year 1)

Medical School: Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, MO
Residency: Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
Favorite microbe: Dracunculus medinensis
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: I was originally inspired to pursue ID during my undergraduate parasitology course. I continue to love clinical ID because you get invited to all of the coolest parties in the hospital!
What I love about Washington University: When I interviewed I was so impressed with the faculty and the palpable climate of collaboration within the greater institution. It also quickly became clear to me that the research opportunities were endless, one's career development would be highly individualized, and that I could truly envision myself as part of this family.

D. Taylor Hendrixson, MD (Combined ID/Newborn Med, Year 5)

Medical School: University of Alabama School of Medicine
Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Scholarly project: Maternal-neonatal health in Sierra Leone (Dr. Mark Manary)
T32: Pediatric Gastroenterology Research Training 
Favorite microbe: Plasmodium falciparum is one of my favorite organisms. After a recent infection, I thoroughly respect that beast!
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: I chose a career in Infectious Diseases because despite marked progress, infectious diseases remain the leading cause of death in children under 5 worldwide.
What I love about Washington University: Wash U has been extremely supportive of my non-traditional training pathway and has enabled me to perform meaningful research to improve birth outcomes in vulnerable populations in low and middle-income settings.

Suong Nguyen, MD, PhD (Accelerated Research Pathway/PSTP, Year 3)

Medical School: University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, TX
Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Scholarly project: Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum HRPII (Dr. Daniel Goldberg)
T32: Training of the Pediatric Physician-Scientist
Favorite microbe: I am partial to the protozoan pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. (like my alliteration?)
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: I am fascinated by how pathogens have evolved to subvert the immune system and how infectious diseases touches every aspect of medicine. I discovered early in medical school that I am most simpatico with the infectious disease folks; we have our own variety of nerdiness.
What I love about Washington University: Our diverse faculty provide a great breadth of clinical and academic expertise. I also love being a part of our HIV clinic for the touch of primary care experience.

Michael Quinn, MD, PhD (Year 1)

Medical School: Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Favorite microbe: The virus from “12 Monkeys,” because sometimes the only way to fight a virus is to live underground and travel back in time.
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: I enjoy studying the delicate relationship between humans and microbes because any imbalance carries the potential for clinical consequences. Additionally, ID is a specialty that consults on some of the most interesting cases in the hospital and requires broad differentials that necessitate attention to detail when performing histories and exams.
What I love about Washington University: Wash U is among the top ID programs and bolsters its fellowship training with great faculty mentors performing innovative research, as well as a breadth of interesting clinical ID cases. What made the Wash U ID program personally special is that I learned during my residency at SLCH that I wanted to work with the people in this program every day.

Drew J. Schwartz, MD, PhD (Accelerated Research Pathway/PSTP, Year 4)

Medical School: Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital
Scholarly project: Antibiotic effects on neonatal microbiome and immune development (Dr. Gautam Dantas)
PIDS-St. Jude Fellowship Award (2017-2020)
Favorite microbe: Enterobacter cloacae
Why I chose Infectious Diseases: I love thinking about all of the different organisms that belong (or DON’T) in different body sites and the balance between host-pathogen warfare and the fostering of mutualism between host and microbe.
What I love about Washington University: The ample research opportunities in both basic and clinical research, the collegial nature of all the faculty, and the amazing breadth and depth of infections we see.

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