Washington University Rare Lung Disease Center

Introduction

The internationally recognized Washington University Rare Lung Disease Center at St. Louis Children's Hospital is dedicated to the treatment of patients with unusual lung diseases, offering a comprehensive diagnostic approach for patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, interstitial lung diseases, and other conditions that affect the respiratory tract.

Over the past decade, the Center has steadily grown in size, and we are involved in the care of infants and children who have been referred for evaluation of undiagnosed lung diseases from across the United States. A full complement of medical subspecialty and surgical consultants is available, many of whom are actively involved in the program.

The Center is directed by Amjad Horani, MD, and faculty members from the Division of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine participate in patient evaluation and care, including Thomas Ferkol, MD, Jessica Pittman, MD, MPH, and Maleewan Kitcharoensakkul, MD MSCI. As part of the Center's multidisciplinary approach, Maithilee Menezes, MD, Department of Otolaryngology, offers a dedicated ambulatory clinic for children with primary ciliary dyskinesia and other lung diseases who have complications involving the middle ear and paranasal sinuses. The Center has close relationships with clinicians from the Washington University Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Barnes-Jewish Medical Center, facilitating transition of care as patients reach adulthood.

The Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine has an established core of committed, internationally recognized physician-scientists and clinical investigators. The Rare Lung Disease Center has strong collaborative relationships with Washington University investigators from clinical and basic science departments, including the Cilia Research Group, which has allowed us to consider questions fundamental to our understanding of primary ciliary dyskinesia. Indeed, the Center is a long-standing member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported Genetic Diseases of Mucociliary Clearance Consortium, a clinical research network created to define the genetics, pathogenesis, natural history, and treatment of rare suppurative airway diseases, with a focus on primary ciliary dyskinesia and undiagnosed forms of bronchiectasis.

For information concerning patient referrals, please contact Dr. Amjad Horani, or Jane Quante, RN, (314) 454-4131.

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