Fields, Melanie  fields_m@kids.wustl.edu

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Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology
Hematology and Oncology

phone: (314) 454-6018

Education

  • BS, cum laude, Tulane University2003
  • MD, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston2008
  • MSCI, Washington University in St. Louis2014

Training

  • Resident Physician, St. Louis Children's Hospital2008 - 2011
  • Clinical Fellow, Washington University in St. Louis2011 - 2014

Licensure and Board Certification

  • 2012 - 2022General Pediatrics Board Certified
  • 2013 - PresMO, Missouri Medical License
  • 2015 - 2025Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Honors and Awards

  • Institute of Clinical and Translational Science Research Forum for Child Health Supplemental Funding Award (NCATS UL1TR000448)2015
  • American Society of Hematology Clinical Research Training Institute Participant2016
  • American Society of Hematology Advocacy Leadership Institute2017
  • Key Opinion Leader for Sickle Cell Disease Poster Walk at the 2020 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting2020
  • NHLBI Hope for Sickle Cell Disease Challenge - First Place2021

Recent Publications view all (15)


Publication Co-Authors

  1. Neurologic and Cognitive Outcomes in Sickle Cell Disease from Infancy through Adolescence. Neoreviews. 2021;22(8):e531-e539. PMID:34341160 
  2. Cerebral Oxygen Metabolic Stress, Microstructural Injury, and Infarction in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease. Neurology. 2021. PMID:34172536 
  3. Bulk Volume Susceptibility Difference Between Deoxyhemoglobin and Oxyhemoglobin for HbA and HbS: A Comparative Study Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2021;85(6):3383-3393. PMID:33475200 
  4. Functional Connectivity Decreases with Metabolic Stress in Sickle Cell Disease. Ann Neurol. 2020;88(5):995-1008. PMCID:PMC7592195  PMID:32869335 
  5. Personalizing transfusion in sickle cell disease: where is the canary in the mine? Transfusion. 2019;59(8):2493-2495. PMID:31374145 
  6. Higher executive abilities following a blood transfusion in children and young adults with sickle cell disease. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2019;66(10):e27899. doi:10.1002/pbc.27899  PMCID:PMC6707832  PMID:31267645 
  7. Hydroxyurea reduces cerebral metabolic stress in patients with sickle cell anemia. Blood. 2019. PMID:30858231 
  8. Advances in Understanding Ischemic Stroke Physiology and the Impact of Vasculopathy in Children With Sickle Cell Disease. Stroke. 2019;50(2):266-273. PMCID:PMC6385587  PMID:30661504 
  9. Silent infarcts in sickle cell anemia occur in the borderzone region and are associated with low cerebral blood flow. Blood. 2018. PMID:30061156 
  10. Regional oxygen extraction predicts border zone vulnerability to stroke in sickle cell disease. Neurology. 2018. PMID:29500287 
  11. Red cell exchange transfusions lower cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction in pediatric sickle cell anemia. Blood. 2017. PMID:29255068 
  12. Large-Vessel Vasculopathy in Children with Sickle Cell Disease: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Infarct Topography and Focal Atrophy Pediatric Neurology. 2016. PMID:28159432 
  13. A Pilot Study of Parent Education Intervention Improves Early Childhood Development Among Toddlers with Sickle Cell Disease Pediatric Blood & Cancer. 2016;63(12):2131-2138. PMID:27509845 
  14. Red Blood Cell Storage Duration is Not Associated with Clinical Outcomes for Acute Chest Syndrome in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Transfusion. 2015. PMID:26033266 
  15. Higher-than-expected prevalence of silent cerebral infarcts in children with hemoglobin SC disease Blood. 2015;125(2):416. PMID:25573975 
Last updated: 09/14/2021
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