Joshua B. Rubin, M.D., Ph.D.  rubin_j@kids.wustl.edu

Professor of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology
Professor, Neurology
Professor, Neuroscience
NeurologyDevelopmental BiologyNeuroscienceHematology and Oncology

phone: (314) 454-6018

Education

  • MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine1994
  • PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine1994
  • BS, Yale University1982
  • MSc, Albert Einstein College of Medicine1992

Training

  • Internship in Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital1994 - 1995
  • Residency in Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital1995 - 1997
  • Fellowship in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children's Hospital1997 - 2000
  • Post-Doctoral Fellow, Dana Farber Cancer Institute1998 - 2003

Licensure and Board Certification

  • MA, MA 1994
  • MO 2003
  • American Board of Pediatrics, sub-board in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 2004

Honors

  • Alpha Omega Alpha1993
  • NICHD Scholar of the Child Health Research Center for Excellence in developmental biology at Washington University School of Medicine2003
  • Andrew Hennessey Memorial Award for Scientific Research2005
  • Elected Member, Society for Pediatric Research2008 - Pres
  • Hyundai Scholar2008
  • Top 10 Percent Washington University School of Medicine Faculty on patient satisfaction surveys2008
  • Hyundai Scholar2013 - 2015

Recent Publications view all (74)


Publication Co-Authors

  1. Fetal microchimerism in human brain tumors. 2017. PMID:28921714 
  2. Sexual dimorphism in glioma glycolysis underlies sex differences in survival. JCI Insight. 2017;2(15). PMID:28768910 
  3. Cell-intrinsic, Bmal1-dependent Circadian Regulation of Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma. J Biol Rhythms. 2017;32(2):121-129. PMID:28470120 
  4. Reprogramming Medulloblastoma-Propagating Cells by a Combined Antagonism of Sonic Hedgehog and CXCR4. Cancer Res. 2016. PMID:28031228 
  5. Targeted detection of genetic alterations reveal the prognostic impact of H3K27M and MAPK pathway aberrations in paediatric thalamic glioma. Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2016;4(1):93. PMCID:PMC5006436  PMID:27577993 
  6. Olig2-Dependent Reciprocal Shift in PDGF and EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Tumor Phenotype and Mitotic Growth in Malignant Glioma. Cancer Cell. 2016;29(5):669-83. PMID:27165742 
  7. Intersections at the crossroads: Neurofibromatosis type 1, cAMP, sex, and glioma risk. Mol Cell Oncol. 2016;3(3):e1069917. PMCID:PMC4909402  PMID:27314079 
  8. Prognostic value of medulloblastoma extent of resection after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective integrated clinical and molecular analysis. Lancet Oncol. 2016;17(4):484-95. PMCID:PMC4907853  PMID:26976201 
  9. The Fallacy of Univariate Solutions to Complex Systems Problems. Front Neurosci. 2016;10:267. PMID:27375425 
  10. Novel chemical library screen identifies naturally occurring plant products that specifically disrupt glioblastoma-endothelial cell interactions. Oncotarget. 2015;6(21):18282-92. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.4957  PMID:26286961 
  11. Sexual selection and cancer biology. Oncotarget. 2015;6(18):15714-5. PMCID:PMC4599216  PMID:26158217 
  12. The cyclic AMP pathway is a sex-specific modifier of glioma risk in type I neurofibromatosis patients. Cancer Res. 2015;75(1):16-21. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-1891  PMCID:PMC4286430  PMID:25381154 
  13. WNT activation by lithium abrogates TP53 mutation associated radiation resistance in medulloblastoma. Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2014;2:174. doi:10.1186/s40478-014-0174-y  PMCID:PMC4297452  PMID:25539912 
  14. Combined VEGF and CXCR4 antagonism targets the GBM stem cell population and synergistically improves survival in an intracranial mouse model of glioblastoma. Oncotarget. 2014;5(20):9811-22. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.2443  PMCID:PMC4259439  PMID:25238146 
  15. Sexually dimorphic RB inactivation underlies mesenchymal glioblastoma prevalence in males. J Clin Invest. 2014;124(9):4123-33. doi:10.1172/JCI71048  PMCID:PMC4151215  PMID:25083989 
  16. The G protein α subunit Gαs is a tumor suppressor in Sonic hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma. Nat Med. 2014;20(9):1035-42. doi:10.1038/nm.3666  PMID:25150496 
  17. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma. Nat Genet. 2014;46(5):462-6. doi:10.1038/ng.2950  PMID:24705250 
  18. Reply: To PMID 24375753. Ann Neurol. 2014;75(5):800-1. PMID:24752946 
  19. A phase II trial of a multi-agent oral antiangiogenic (metronomic) regimen in children with recurrent or progressive cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014;61(4):636-42. doi:10.1002/pbc.24794  PMID:24123865 
  20. Cytogenetic prognostication within medulloblastoma subgroups. J Clin Oncol. 2014;32(9):886-96. doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.50.9539  PMCID:PMC3948094  PMID:24493713 
  21. Sex Is a major determinant of neuronal dysfunction in neurofibromatosis type 1. Ann Neurol. 2014;75(2):309-16. PMCID:PMC4172335  PMID:24375753 
  22. PDE7B is a novel, prognostically significant mediator of glioblastoma growth whose expression is regulated by endothelial cells. PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107397. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107397  PMCID:PMC4159344  PMID:25203500 
  23. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma. Acta Neuropathol. 2013;126(6):917-29. doi:10.1007/s00401-013-1198-2  PMCID:PMC3830749  PMID:24174164 
  24. Subgroup-specific prognostic implications of TP53 mutation in medulloblastoma. J Clin Oncol. 2013. doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.48.5052  PMID:23835706 
  25. Antiangiogenic agents for nonmalignant brain tumors. J Neurol Surg B Skull Base. 2013;74(3):136-41. doi:10.1055/s-0033-1338262  PMCID:PMC3709924  PMID:24436903 
  26. Growth factor receptor-Src-mediated suppression of GRK6 dysregulates CXCR4 signaling and promotes medulloblastoma migration. Mol Cancer. 2013;12:18. doi:10.1186/1476-4598-12-18  PMCID:PMC3599655  PMID:23497290 
  27. F11R is a novel monocyte prognostic biomarker for malignant glioma. PLoS One. 2013;8(10):e77571. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077571  PMCID:PMC3795683  PMID:24147027 
  28. Parent-of-origin in individuals with familial neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas. Fam Cancer. 2012;11(4):653-6. doi:10.1007/s10689-012-9549-z  PMID:22829012 
  29. Astrocyte TNFR2 is required for CXCL12-mediated regulation of oligodendrocyte progenitor proliferation and differentiation within the adult CNS. Acta Neuropathol. 2012;124(6):847-60. doi:10.1007/s00401-012-1034-0  PMCID:PMC3508279  PMID:22933014 
  30. Subgroup-specific structural variation across 1,000 medulloblastoma genomes. Nature. 2012;488(7409):49-56. doi:10.1038/nature11327  PMID:22832581 
  31. CXCL12 mediates trophic interactions between endothelial and tumor cells in glioblastoma. PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33005. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033005  PMCID:PMC3299723  PMID:22427929 
  32. Oligodendrogliomas in children. J Neurooncol. 2012;106(2):377-82. doi:10.1007/s11060-011-0674-6  PMID:21842314 
  33. Suppression of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 3 expression is a feature of classical GBM that is required for maximal growth. Mol Cancer Res. 2012;10(1):156-66. doi:10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-11-0411  PMCID:PMC3262072  PMID:22086906 
  34. CXCR4 activation defines a new subgroup of Sonic hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma. Cancer Res. 2012;72(1):122-32. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-1701  PMCID:PMC3520097  PMID:22052462 
  35. Glioblastoma in children: a single-institution experience. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011;80(4):1117-21. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.03.013  PMID:21220190 
  36. Radiation therapy for pilocytic astrocytomas of childhood. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011;79(3):829-34. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.11.015  PMID:20421157 
  37. Postoperative imaging surveillance in pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2010;6(4):346-52. doi:10.3171/2010.7.PEDS10129  PMID:20887107 
  38. CXCL12 alone is insufficient for gliomagenesis in Nf1 mutant mice. J Neuroimmunol. 2010;224(1-2):108-13. doi:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2010.05.002  PMCID:PMC2910179  PMID:20554030 
  39. Cyclic AMP suppression is sufficient to induce gliomagenesis in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis-1. Cancer Res. 2010;70(14):5717-27. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3769  PMCID:PMC2905483  PMID:20551058 
  40. Brainstem glioma presenting as pruritus in children with neurofibromatosis-1. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2009;31(12):972-6. doi:10.1097/MPH.0b013e3181b8701f  PMID:19935099 
  41. Targeting the leukemia microenvironment by CXCR4 inhibition overcomes resistance to kinase inhibitors and chemotherapy in AML. Blood. 2009;113(24):6215-24. doi:10.1182/blood-2008-05-158311  PMCID:PMC2699240  PMID:18955566 
  42. Morphine increases brain levels of ferritin heavy chain leading to inhibition of CXCR4-mediated survival signaling in neurons. J Neurosci. 2009;29(8):2534-44. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5865-08.2009  PMCID:PMC2664553  PMID:19244528 
  43. Intensive multimodality treatment for children with newly diagnosed CNS atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor. J Clin Oncol. 2009;27(3):385-9. doi:10.1200/JCO.2008.18.7724  PMCID:PMC2645855  PMID:19064966 
  44. Targeted inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4 promotes brain tumor regression. Clin Cancer Res. 2008;14(23):7717-25. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-0827  PMCID:PMC2615415  PMID:19047098 
  45. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system. Med Phys. 2008;35(10):4735-43. doi:10.1118/1.2977762  PMCID:PMC2736759  PMID:18975718 
  46. Use of thalidomide to diminish growth velocity in a life-threatening congenital intracranial hemangioma. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2008;2(2):125-9. doi:10.3171/PED/2008/2/8/125  PMCID:PMC2737696  PMID:18671617 
  47. Rethinking brain tumors: the fourth Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium nervous system tumors workshop. Cancer Res. 2008;68(14):5508-11. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-0703  PMCID:PMC2678167  PMID:18632599 
  48. Pathological expression of CXCL12 at the blood-brain barrier correlates with severity of multiple sclerosis. Am J Pathol. 2008;172(3):799-808. doi:10.2353/ajpath.2008.070918  PMCID:PMC2258272  PMID:18276777 
  49. Preclinical cancer therapy in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis-1 optic glioma. Cancer Res. 2008;68(5):1520-8. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-5916  PMID:18316617 
  50. Spatiotemporal differences in CXCL12 expression and cyclic AMP underlie the unique pattern of optic glioma growth in neurofibromatosis type 1. Cancer Res. 2007;67(18):8588-95. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-06-2220  PMID:17875698 
  51. Blocking CXCR4-mediated cyclic AMP suppression inhibits brain tumor growth in vivo. Cancer Res. 2007;67(2):651-8. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-06-2762  PMID:17234775 
  52. The role of surgical biopsy in the diagnosis of glioma in individuals with neurofibromatosis-1. Neurology. 2006;67(8):1509-12. doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000240076.31298.47  PMID:17060590 
  53. Widespread CXCR4 activation in astrocytomas revealed by phospho-CXCR4-specific antibodies. Cancer Res. 2005;65(24):11392-9. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-0847  PMID:16357147 
  54. A feasibility trial of antiangiogenic (metronomic) chemotherapy in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive cancer. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2005;27(11):573-81. PMID:16282886 
  55. Perfusion MRI of U87 brain tumors in a mouse model. Magn Reson Med. 2004;51(5):893-9. doi:10.1002/mrm.20029  PMID:15122670 
  56. A small-molecule antagonist of CXCR4 inhibits intracranial growth of primary brain tumors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003;100(23):13513-8. doi:10.1073/pnas.2235846100  PMCID:PMC263845  PMID:14595012 
  57. Cerebellar proteoglycans regulate sonic hedgehog responses during development. Development. 2002;129(9):2223-32. PMID:11959830 
  58. BDNF stimulates migration of cerebellar granule cells. Development. 2002;129(6):1435-42. PMID:11880352 
  59. Successful antiangiogenic therapy of giant cell angioblastoma with interferon alfa 2b: report of 2 cases. Pediatrics. 2002;109(2):E37. PMID:11826247 
  60. SDF-1 alpha induces chemotaxis and enhances Sonic hedgehog-induced proliferation of cerebellar granule cells. Development. 2001;128(11):1971-81. PMID:11493520 
  61. Molecular determinants of electrical rectification of single channel conductance in gap junctions formed by connexins 26 and 32. J Gen Physiol. 1999;114(3):339-64. PMCID:PMC2229461  PMID:10469726 
  62. Structure-function studies of voltage sensitivity of connexins, the family of gap junction forming proteins. Jpn J Physiol. 1993;43 Suppl 1:S301-10. PMID:8271512 
  63. A domain substitution procedure and its use to analyze voltage dependence of homotypic gap junctions formed by connexins 26 and 32. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1992;89(9):3820-4. PMCID:PMC525582  PMID:1315041 
  64. Molecular analysis of voltage dependence of heterotypic gap junctions formed by connexins 26 and 32. Biophys J. 1992;62(1):183-93; discussion 193-5. doi:10.1016/S0006-3495(92)81804-0  PMCID:PMC1260515  PMID:1376166 
  65. Receptor-mediated transcytosis of transferrin across the blood-brain barrier. J Neurosci Res. 1987;18(2):299-304. doi:10.1002/jnr.490180206  PMID:3694713 
  66. Structural requirements for the transmembrane activation of the insulin receptor kinase. J Biol Chem. 1986;261(32):15281-7. PMID:3021769 
  67. The insulin receptor protein kinase. Physicochemical requirements for activity. J Biol Chem. 1983;258(23):14450-5. PMID:6557114 
  68. Stimulation of tyrosine-specific phosphorylation in vitro by insulin-like growth factor I. Nature. 1983;305(5933):438-40. PMID:6312321 
  69. 18F-FDOPA PET/MRI for monitoring early response to bevacizumab in children with recurrent brain tumors. Neuro-Oncology Practice. 
  70. Clinically important sex differences in GBM biology revealed by analysis of male and female imaging, transcriptome and survival data Science Translational Medicine. 
  71. Differential Brd4 bound stretch/super enhancers drive critical sex differences in glioblastoma Science. 
  72. Cooperative p16 and p21 action protects female astrocytes from transformation. Cancer Research. 
  73. Temporal and clinical Progression in a pediatric ependymoma through multiple treatments. Acta Neuropathologica. 
  74. Sonic hedgehog and GRK3 regulate CXCR4 sub cellular localization and Galphai signaling during early cerebellar development. Developmental Biology. 
Last updated: 10/17/2017
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